5 Questions with ServSafe Instructor Lindsay

5 Questions with ServSafe Instructor Lindsay

1.  You were a student at MWI when you were 19, what made you want to learn bartending, and how did it affect your life?

I wanted to learn bartending because I’d been waitressing since the time I was 16 and I knew I wanted to work for tips.  Bartending seemed to me like the top of the food chain.  They made the most money, had the best hours, and seemed to be the most glamorous.  Where I worked, we always had to wear a goofy shirt and a tie, and they wore sexy fitted V-Neck t-shirts.
I was able to make really good money at a young age, and basically put myself through Drexel, and be able to afford all the things that I wanted.  And it gave me financial independence from my parents.  
2.  Having been Bartending for so long, why do you think ServSafe is so important?
I think ServSafe is really important because there are a lot of legal responsiblities that come along with Restaurants and Bars that people on the outside don’t realize.  So it’s very important to understand the legal ramifacations that can come from irresponsible service.  Because of that, it makes you that much more attractive to employers.
3.  What’s one example of something that most people don’t know, that you learn during ServSafe training that immediately makes you work more responsibly and safely?
The fact that you can be a 3rd party liability for damages that occur from people getting injured due to service at your bar, and that you can also lose your job is really surprising for most people, and it really shifts the way they take responsibility for their actions at work.
4.  What’s the most challenging part of serving responsibly in the real world?
The hardest part of serving responsibly in the real word is the awkwardness that can come from carding people when you don’t want to, or cutting someone off who’s a regular, it can be a very uncomfortable situation.
 
5.  What advice do you have for someone who is just graduating and isn’t really used to a bar environment and is suddenly faced with a situation where they have to make someone uncomfortable?
I give a lot of ways to mitigate that tension in the class, but one strategy that works really well for me, is to talk to the host of the party, or the friend who looks the most responsible, and they’ve always been great at getting their friend to stop drinking and get home safely.  Nobody wants to be embarrassed, or to be known as the guy who ruined it for their friends, so if you get friends involved, social pressure will do a lot of the work for you.